Home > Cricket, Guest Blogs > Tendulkar’s achievement is Bradmanesque

Tendulkar’s achievement is Bradmanesque

By Faisal Hanif

Like most sports the game of cricket has its internal debates concerning those it sees as the standard bearers of excellence throughout its long history. Unlike many, cricket has at least managed to single out one individual above all others; Don Bradman. Bradman is widely regarded as the undisputed greatest player of all time.

Bradman’s claim to this title comes as a result of extraordinary statistics. The Don finished a 52 test match career in 1948 with a batting average of 99.94 and in a sport seemingly obsessed with statistics this is beyond compare.

Of course statistics like most things are relative but Bradman’s numbers are lauded for this very reason. His average dwarfs that of any of his rivals who have played over 20 test matches. His three closest competitors are Graeme Pollock, George Headley and Herbert Sutcliffe, who all achieved averages of just over 60, with the former two having played less than half the number of tests.

The Don’s numbers are so prolific that on a statistical basis alone he has claim to not only be hailed as the cricketer supreme, but also the greatest sportsman of all time.

However, if Bradman’s achievements are held in such high esteem, then Sachin Tendulkar’s achievement of scoring one hundred international centuries must be placed on a similar pedestal. Tendulkar may not be near the Don when it comes to career average, but similarly nobody comes close to India’s Little Master where international centuries are concerned.

Tendulkar celebrates one of his 100 centuries

Like Bradman, Tendulkar is way ahead of his compatriots with Ricky Ponting heading up the chasing pack on 71 international hundreds. With the Australian having had his limited overs international career brought to an end in recent weeks and seemingly being one bad run of form away from demotion from test cricket, he has little hope of catching Tendulkar. South Africa’s Jacques Kallis comes next on 59 centuries but at 36 years of age will likewise fall someway short of Tendulkar’s feat.

Ponting and Kallis like Lara, Gavaskar, Richards and Sobers before them, will be considered amongst the giants of cricketing history. Yet when Bradman’s name crops up only Tendulkar is mentioned alongside the Aussie maestro. Even Don Bradman himself mentioned that amongst modern players, Tendulkar resembles him most in terms of technique; a technique which comprises picture perfect balance and is exemplified by a beautiful range of stroke play that has put the best bowling attacks to the sword. Even when age has curtailed some of the flamboyance Tendulkar’s brilliance has shone through, as seen in his epic battle with Dale Steyn to reach his 51st and most recent test century in 2011.

This ability to face any challenge that has come his way has put Tendulkar ahead of his contemporaries and made certain that he outlasted them all. Many point to the idiosyncrasies of the different eras that Bradman and Tendulkar inhabit to decide on who is the superior batsman. The nature of the pitches, the quality of opposition and the different types of game with the advent of limited overs cricket all major points of contention. Even if such factors could be analysed to give a definitive answer the sentiments of one billion plus Indians and millions of Australians would be little affected. Such an argument can be left for another time, perhaps when Tendulkar finally hangs up his gloves will the ultimate comparison be fully discussed and settled.

What has sustained Don Bradman’s legacy however is the acceptance from many within the cricketing fraternity that Bradman’s average is unattainable and no one will ever come close to it. Likewise Tendulkar’s feat is also being hailed in similar terms as a record unlikely to ever be broken. At present it seems as if Sachin’s desire for the game is the only thing that can prevent him from adding to his tally of international hundreds and such an occurrence would solidify such a viewpoint.

Whatever becomes of Tendulkar’s records his achievement must be seen for what it is. To score one hundred international centuries is an astonishing feat. It’s a testament to the longevity and adaptability of the Little Master that he has carved it out over 22 years at the top. Wherever he takes his place in the pantheon of cricketing legends it is safe to assume that no player has possessed Tendulkar’s ability to seamlessly transform his game according to the demands of the time and situation.

The argument has always held sway that statistics show that that no one comes close to the Don. If that has been fact for over half a century then on one level we may now pose a challenge. To adopt poker parlance, we will see Bradman’s average and raise you Tendulkar’s hundreds.

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Categories: Cricket, Guest Blogs
  1. Miles
    March 21, 2012 at 9:24 am

    Nice article. You’ve got to love Sach.

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